Bag Balm, Since 1899

Once January rolls around, a New Englander’s body tends to really feel the roughness of winter. The snow falls are now two footers instead of flurries. So we spend long days enjoying the fresh powder on the mountain, and get a good dose of windburn in the process. Then most of us spend eight hours a day in our overly heated offices, which sucks every last drop of moisture out of us. Needless to say, skin gets chapped and dry by January when you live in New Englander. The best cure is Bag Balm. A Vermont  original, the formula was bought by John L. Norris in 1899 as a salve for cow’s udders and pets’ paws. Norris’ Bag Balm quickly became a farmer’s staple and the recognizable green tin (designed in Boston) has barely changed over the past century. I wouldn’t be exaggerating when I say that practically every New England family I know has a big tin of Bag Balm on their bathroom counter. And not just for their pets! It’s there to be slathered on cracking elbows and knees, windburned cheeks, and chapped lips. Do your skin (and your dog’s paws) a favor and pick up one of those green tins at your local drugstore or general store.

 

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3 Comments

Filed under Style

3 responses to “Bag Balm, Since 1899

  1. I literally love everything about Bag Balm, the packaging, the design, the smell, the fact that it works! Saw a mini bag balm that was scaled down for dollhouses from the 70s on ebay. I want it!

  2. Indiana as well.
    I’ve been using it all winter to great success.

  3. Brian

    Bought some yesterday and it is pure gravy in a nice tin. Required for Boston living.

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